About your Search

20130318
20130326
STATION
CSPAN2 13
CSPAN 5
CNNW 2
KTVU (FOX) 1
MSNBCW 1
LANGUAGE
English 25
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25
plunging into the level of debt and deficit spending that has been taking place here over the past several years. eventually we're going to reach that tipping point. when we reach that tip point, investors and consumer lose conference. and when that happens, interest rates right. and when interest rates rise, it impacts our economy in a very significantly negative way. all we have to do is look across the atlantic at europe and what's happening there to get a glimpse of the crisis that can come from not dealing with ever-increasing debt and not taking steps necessary over a period of time to put your country on a fiscal path to health. now, i think most of us know here that we have to make some tough choices and it's going to require political will in order for us to address this. we've been avoiding this for years. expoo we're going to face a debt-induced catastrophe if we don't address it and drean addrt soon. so when you're faced with this kind of fiscal mess, what do you do? well, what families and pise businesses all across america have had to do when they face these types of situatio
federal revenues should be changed, deficits, public debt and debt held by the public. the presiding officer: without objection, so ordered. mrs. murray: i ask unanimous consent the following members of my budget committee staff be granted full floor access for the duration of the consideration of s. con. res. -- john rider and rick jones. the presiding officer: without objection, so ordered. mrs. murray: finally, mr. president, i ask unanimous consent the period of debate for economic goals and policy under section 305-b of the congressional budget act occur on march 21 at a time to be determined by the two managers. the presiding officer: without objection, so ordered. mrs. murray: thank you, mr. president. we are now on the floor of the senate with the budget. i want to thank my counterpart, mr. sessions, for all his work and his staff's work and my staff's to get us to the point here that we are debating this bill and this amendment. senator sessions has been very gracious in working with us. we have gotten to this. we obviously have differences of opinion, but i want to commend
. this is something that every family in america is asking us to focus on. number two, we need to tackle our deficit and debt fairly and responsibly. as democrats, we understand that is a responsibility that we bear today and we do it in this budget. and number three, we need to keep the promises we made as a nation to our seniors and our families and our communities. many who have struggled so much over the last few years and are counting on us to be there for them again now. mr. president, we'll be hearing a lot more about all these principles today and we're going to discuss the stark contrast between the budget that is expected to move in the house of representatives today and the plan and path forward that we have put forward here in the senate as democrats. mr. president, i will yield to senator sessions for his opening remarks, and we will continue this debate throughout the day. mr. sessions: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from alabama. mr. sessions: i thank the chair and would express my appreciation to senator murray for her leadership and who are courtesy and her skill
nation that does not -- is not riddled with debt and deficit, but also a nation that continues to be the economic leader in the world. and i believe our plan makes -- protects those investments in those key components of growth. and i hope over the coming hours that we will go through this debate and -- and i know we'll have a spirited period of a lot of amendments. this -- this budget i believe will pass and it will have to then find agreement with our colleagues in the house. and i just want to again commend both the chair and, for that matter, the ranking member. at the end of the day, we have to find common agreement to get this done. this issue that hovers all over of our other debates has become a metaphor as to whether our institutions can if you please in the 2 1*9 century. so just as the chair and rank member found agreement through a markup process where both sides were heard and amendments were offered and debated in a fair and open process, i want to both thank the chair and rank member for their commitment. they have different idead about how we get there, but at t
the deficit and invest in the middle class, not be used just to simply cut tax rates for the rich the way that the house budget did. so, mr. president, we have a few more hours of debate this morning between now and 11:00, followed by some votes, and then we will close out debate and move on to all the rest of the votes that we will take before final passage sometime late tonight or early tomorrow morning. i ask the senate -- as the senate majority leader said, we have hundreds of amendments filed. if we were to vote on every one of them, we would be here voting every single hour all the way through monday or tuesday. i know most members know that's not going to happen. so i would really encourage every member of the senate to work with the manager on their side to let us know which amendments are your priority so we can get them up sooner rather than later and vote on the ones that you want us to. so i urge all of our colleagues to work with us and our staffs and with ranking member sessions and his staff to make sure we know what your priorities are, how you would like to proceed, and w
budget. they now claim their budget would eliminate the deficit in 2023. and house budget committee chairman paul ryan has even said that it doesn't really matter how their budget eliminates the deficit. mr. president, americans across our country who will feel the impact of the choices we make in the coming weeks and months feel that it does matter. so while some of my republican colleagues would probably prefer not to hear about it, i think that the impact of the house republican budget is a crucial part of this debate, and we owe it to the american people to put our opinions on the record. now we've come a long way, mr. president, but there are still far too many americans today who are unemployed or underemployed, which is why our senate budget's first priority is boosting our economic recovery. speaker boehner has actually agreed with president obama that our debt does not present -- quote -- "an immediate crisis." so you might think the house budget would phase in cuts responsibly so we can protect our fragile recovery. well, instead the house republican budget would do seriou
through a state where wisconsin had faced a multibillion dollar budget deficit, we were having double-digit tax increases, and we saw some of the record job loss that we've seen in the past. so what did we do? we came in and took that deficit, $3.6 billion, and today it's nearly half a billion dollar surplus. we took up -- [applause] we took a state where taxes had gone up, and we not only lowered the overall tax burden for the first time in years, property taxes on a median value home had gone town in each of the last two years. [applause] and when it comes, and when it comes to jobs under my predecessor's term, wisconsin had lost 133,000 jobs, and back in 2010 a survey showed just 10% of our employers thought we were headed in the right direction. today we're gaining jobs and 93% of our employers say wisconsin is heading in the right direction. we can lead with an optimistic message. [applause] simply put, we showed in our election that when people realized the debate was between who do you want in charge, the big government special interests n this case the employee unions, or do y
to reduce the deficit. unfortunately, rather than seriously considering the credible path that we have presented in our budget plan, some republicans have decided to play some games with the numbers, and they just are not telling the truth. instead of subtracting the sequestration replacement portion in the investment package from the $975 billion in total revenue, they're trying to say that you should somehow add them all together. they are taking one side of the ledger, combining it with the other side of the ledger and coming to some conclusion that makes absolutely no sense to us. mr. president, this would be like handing over $2 to buy a cup of coffee and having someone say, well the price was actually $2 plus the value of that coffee. it doesn't make any sense. and, by the way, you don't have to take my word for it. fact checkers and reporters have called this claim false and a step too far. and "the washington post" fact correcter even gave it two pinocchios. mr. president, i ask unanimous consent to insert in the record a story from "the washington post" on this inaccurate clai
. we shouldn't run a deficit at least one that is as large now. i think it's precarious and for the senators, democratic senators running for reelection in red states. that is why you saw four democratic senators they are all representing states that barack obama lost. >> gregg: speaking of debt and deficits, president obama said recently the debt is not an immediate problem, but by huge margins, americans disagree. 68% of them disagree with the president on that. they also think he is wrong with b something else. spending. this is a fox news poll. they think his top priority should be cutting spending to reduce the deficit, not spend more, taxpayer dollars to create jobs. is that why president obama seemed to have dropped the campaign for spending realize he is pushing his job ratings down and in the process driving away potential voters? >> i think there has been a sense over the last month or so, as you point out poll numbers have gone down. white house is not going to make a big campaigns go across the country asking for tax increases but that is also because they ar
trillion in debt. we have deficits we can't even wrap our arms around, and they want more of your money. if you were a financial advisor that put you $1 million in debt and ripped through your college savings for your children and all of your checking account and said, just give me more money and we'll solve the problem, would you do it? absolutely not. more than jobs, though, we are also working to save medicare and social security, the commitments that we have made to the american people. so let's take a look here at the big picture. here's a budget breakdown of where we are at right now. look, your eyes are glazed over and we start talking about the trillions of dollars that we spend, but let's take a look at what you pay versus what you expect. this big blue part right here? that's on auto pilot. no adults have come to the table to talk about where we are at today and how to actually save your social security and medicare and medicaid in this big blue part. we are doing that today. house republicans in balancing the budget. but this is what you expect from the federal government. yo
? >> sure, i do. one problem with the baseline is it brings the deficit later on of the we looked at the budget and realized we could probably balance in five years. the problem is with the way the numbers work is it brings you back out of balance soon thereafter. what we wanted to do is have a credible plan that got us to balancing, got us into surplus. that's what our budget does. there is something unique in the baseline where deficits go down to the mid part of the next ten years and then go right back up. what we want to do is get them on a downward path and keep them down. we not only balance the budget, we go into surpluses and pay off the debt. >> brian: here is chris van hollen. he seems to disagree with everything you say. here is an example. >> i'm used to that. >> let me focus first on what our budget focuses on, which is not just economic growth in jobs in the future, but jobs in economic growth now and in the future. this republican budget is not balanced in ten years. >> brian: is he right? is it not in balance? >> no, it does balance in ten years. they're throwing
without a hint of how it would be possible. without exploding the deficit or dramatically raising taxes on the middle class. this is consistent with what the romney ryan ticket said on the campaign trail last fall. the same issue where they dodged, assembled, and ignored the perfectly reasonable question how is it possible? six months later it's back in the budget but there's still -- but there still is no answer. during the last 40 years there have been only four budgets without deficits. the last three clinton budgets and the one that george bush inherited from bill clinton. in each case taxes as a percentage of the total economy were over 20%. in this republican fantasy land budgets are balanced with revenues at 19% of the economy, yet meeting the needs of 78 million more seniors and a infrastructure deficit that is growing as america is falling apart. clearly this is not remotely possible if we are going to enjoy anything like our current quality of life. there is a real world intersection of budget saving opportunities with potential areas of agreement. health care reform is one. b
be in a deficit in 10 years the argument however is that the senate budget creates jobs and economic growth from the middle out. now, that's according to the author. senator pattie murray. for the democrats the vote is a really big accomplishment. >> first of all, over the last two decades the average budget resolution considered 78 amendments. we have done 101. the average vote arama 70 amendments. twice as many. doing this has been a her could herculessen feet. senator murray and senator sessions. >> during the vote senators were facing more than 500 amendments which were filed but 70 were voted on. of course when you do take a 13 hour six minute vote there has to be a little bit of humor. >> it is good to say that as -- as of this time, 5:00 a.m., there has not been a day without a budget being passed in the united states senate. >> and some interesting observations from the vote. all democrats voted yeah with the exception of for up for re-election 2014. unfriendly to democrats. mark beg gich from alaska. baucus from montana. pryor from arc. hagan from north carolina. recently passed the rya
as the chicago public school system faces a reported billion dollar deficit. alderman willie cochran's ward, constituents have been calling all day. >> some cases we are happy, in some cases we are not so happy. >> reporter: on the plus side, the district says the savings will allow major investments in surviving schools including adding 70 libraries, science labs, even air conditioning. for many it's not what's gained but what's lost and where. neighborhood schools in some of chicago's poorest communities. the decisions were based on low enrollment but others say race made a role. an outraged carrie austin, an alderman, told "the chicago tribune," quote, every time the whites go to screaming and hollering, they back off and steam roll over black and brown folks. not this time. and she's not the only one who believes that. you think it's the black communities that often are asked to sacrifice first? >> in this case, yes, i do. yes, i do. >> reporter: this is 70th street in the heart of the city's south side and this is the local elementary school. parents are proud of it. the sign up there
the deficit, creates jobs, ensures global peace and security. t fights a good fight often without a lot of recognition but just doing a good job. not speaking today on behalf congressional black caucus. we have to hold any president ccountable in terms of checks and balances. that is part of the three ranches of government, udiciary, executive and legislati legislative. we have a duty and ensure that y to people have a voice in their guest: let government. what the house of representatives is about. written to president obama and respectfully have sked him to really justify and give us the information about the asis upon which -- legal basis -- the use of drones is engaged in as a result of efforts. we are waiting for the response from them on that. think it is important we ask any president questions as members of congress, it is our responsibility to do that and to personally continue to do that. i think that it president has image changed america's and role in the world and is phenomenal job. but that doesn't mean i won't exercise my duties and rights as ask the of congress to hard q
calling about the obamacare and also about the deficit in the united states. my feeling is, many workers across america have lost their insurance and have lower wages because of company downsizing and lower profits. we still pay government workers high wages and give them excellent paid insurance. maybe it is time to decrease their wages and to make their -- make them have a payment they have to pay for their insurance -- [indiscernible] guest: interesting point you bring up about people losing their health insurance. in a bipartisan move in this budget, there is a directive to couch the effect of the number of people losing their health insurance because of obamacare. it was a republican sponsored saying -- thing. they will try to see how much it is occurring. host: the house approved the continuing resolution by 310- 109. 27 republicans and 82 republicans voted no. theye senate version, passed -- 20 republicans voted yes. the democrat of montana voted no. now that these two measures have been passed by the separate chambers, what happens next? guest: the cr goes to the president. sign
trillion deficits -- that would be the annual difference between what we bring in and what the government spends -- four in a row more than a trillion dollars -- after more than $1.6 trillion in tax increases, after hundreds of billions of dollars worth of new regulations, our country is mired, we are mired in the longest period of high unemployment since the great depression. that is a direct consequence of this huge debt and our creditors' lack of confidence that we're actually serious about dealing with it. indeed, many workers have simply given up on finding work, which is one reason why our labor force participation rate is now at a 32-year low. unemployment's almost 8% but that doesn't take into account the millions of people who have simply given up looking for work after a long period of unemployment. since june 2009, when the recession officially ended, median household income has fallen by more than $2,400. so instead of treading water, the average american family is seeing their buying power decrease by more than $ 2,400 since 2009. at the same time, they're finding not only ar
for tax revenue to help reduce the deficit. it calls for more spending. we are in the funny process where today, we will wrap up beforehand 50 hours of debate and start the unlimited amendment process. any issue that you have heard complaints about, we might see votes on today. droneld be stuff like strikes against u.s. citizens, it could be taxes and repealing healthcare. the point to remember, this is adding on to a budget resolution. it is interesting and it may give people clues as to what appetites there are in the senate to pass or repeal certain elements of policy. host: the headline says the senate is poised to pass a budget. do you expect it to pass? guest: we do expect it to pass. behink the democrats will able to control the process and get it to pass. they have a small window. you would need vice president biden to come down and break the tie. the significance is, this is the result -- there is a lot of pent up frustration on the republican side. that is why we might see a late night tonight and into the morning. once it is passed, i think a lot of people will feel better and
costs as the school system faces a reported $1 billion deficit. ward constituents have been calling all day. >> some cases we're happy, some not so happy. >> reporter: on the plus side, the savings will allow major investments in surviving schools including adding 70 libraries, science labs and even air-conditioning. for many it's not what's gained but what's lost and where. neighborhood schools in some of chicago's poorest communities. school officials say it was based on low enrollments, but others say race played a role. an alderman told the "chicago tribune," every time the whites get to scheming and hollering, they back off and steam roll. not this time. she's
project 1 billion dollar deficit next year. the closures will save chicago $560 million the next decade. >> whether you do this, mike, in chamucla, florida, or chicago, illinois, this is always excruciating tough for parents and kids, but you got to do it if you're going to keep the budget. >> you have to do it to same some semblance of sanity for a big city like that but you get into where are the displaced kids going to go to schools when the schools are closed? are they going to be bussed? most parents would like their kids to go to a neighborhood school and what happens then? that a huge burden for the mayor now. >> totally. sequestration is complicating it even more. we just did a report that head start across the country is facing these exact challenges and cutting school days and not accepting kids and randomly dropping kids from the program and a disadvantage for kids in that economic status. >> you look at the regional and local papers across the country you see endless stories like this. you look at the national programs and turn on the tv news and where is the white house tou
is it doesn't really look like a whole lot. surely not enough to fill our deficit at this point but it is going to bring back the cooler temperatures in the overnight hours with the cloud cover. we will actually see our 0 overnight lows and our morning temperatures come up. low 40s in the forecast tuesday, wednesday, thursday. unsettled weather wednesday and thursday with a bigger storm moving in for the weekend. this second system, or third system i guess we could call it, could bring us scattered showers for saturday and sunday. >>> on tuesday night the sacramento city counsel will consider throwing up a last- second shot to keep the kings from leaving town. the city has struck a daily to build a new $448 million downtown arena, and it would be the largest redevelopment project in sacramento history with up to a million and a half square feet of offices housing shops and a hotel. the city would pay $258 million with most of the money coming from the sale of bonds supported by parking revenues. >> that's part of revitalizing our downtown. that's part of completing the rest of k
. hagan: thank you, mr. president. this amendment establishes a deficit -- the presiding officer: the senate will be in order. mrs. hagan: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from north carolina. mrs. hagan: this amendment establishes a deficit-neutral reserve fund for families of service members and veterans. my home state has the third largest military footprint in the nation. one out of every three people is in the military, a veteran or related to a service member or veteran, and we are proud that we make military families welcome in north carolina because supporting military families is one of the best ways that we can support our troops. this amendment is deficit neutral. it will not add one penny to our deficit. it helps to create room in the budget for legislation to help military families in areas ranging from health care to housing and from education to job placement while their loved ones are serving our country away from home. a vote for this amendment is a vote for our military families, for the sons, daughters, husbands, wives and families who sacrific
of the well. mrs. shaheen: amendment 438 would establish a deficit neutral reserve fund fupped to protect women's access to health care, including family planning and birth control. it ensures employers cannot deny coverage of contraceptives. we've seen that improving access to preventive care including con troo tra ception is good health -- contraception is good health policy and good economic policy. healthier women and healthier children and healthier families. i urge my colleagues to support the amendment. the presiding officer: the senator is recognized. a senator: every senator supports expanding access to health care. we may have differences on how to it but no one should doubt that commitment. however, we must also ensure we protect deeply held religious beliefs of our citizens. in this regard, the shaheen amendment and the new health care law gets it all wrong. mr. johanns: in addition to growing government and slowing the economy, the law tramples on the rights of individuals. later this afternoon senator fischer will offer a side-by-side to this amendment. now i ask my colleagu
that it is the entitlement program -- social security and medicare, the primary drivers of our debt and deficit. this is a simple amendment. it says it establishes a budget point of order that any budget resolution that is brought forward that does not count or does not prepare a 75 year solvency for social security and medicare would be out of order. in the next 20 years we'll be paying out $5.1 trillion in benefits in excess of what we are bringing in in terms of dedicated revenue to the payroll tax. the unfunded liability of social security is $20.5 trillion. for medicare the unfunded liability is $42.8 trillion. these programs must be reformed so they are saved for future generations. again, i would hope everybody would support -- the presiding officer: the senator's time has expired. mr. johnson: -- any budget that does not have 57 year solvency. the presiding officer: the senator from washington. mrs. murray: social security and medicaid played a critical role in providing a foundation of financial security and health care for hundreds of millions of americans over the decades. democrats
of the problem that we're in as a country in terms of our debt and deficits, we have to have programs that have metrics on them, they have to be followed up, the grants have to be followed, and they need to be held to account. so i hope my colleagues -- i have no hopes of this passing, because most of the colleagues won't actually look at the research that's been done on this, won't look at the effectiveness of it, won't look at the waste, and they'll vote a party-line vote to defeat this amendment. we'll get 45 or 50 votes or 51 or 52. but it'll go down and so consequently real problems that have been oversighted by the permanent subcommittee on investigation, really oversighted by the department of homeland security, the real solutions to problems won't happen because of the way this place is being run. i'd next like to talk about amendment 93. amendment 93 follows a recommendation of the president -- not my recommend day, the president's recommendation. and what this amendment would do is actually take money that has been directed for expired heritage area authorizations that weren't any rec
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25